If you thought Wednesday might have been an anomaly, with Alberta’s wind power generation producing 4.5 per cent of its nameplate capacity, that number fell even lower the following morning.

If you just finished your morning coffee in Alberta, your cup of joe was not warmed up by wind power. Well, no more than a couple drops were, as wind was contribution 0.1 per cent of Alberta’s energy load, or 1/1000 of Alberta’s energy load of 10,251 megawatts at that moment.

The Twitter handle Reliable AB Energy (@ReliableAB) posts hourly updates. And at 10:16 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 18, Alberta, wind was producing just 10 megawatts out of 2,589 megawatts of wind turbines connected to the grid.

And an hour earlier, it was just 7 megawatts.

 

By 11:07, wind had nearly quadrupled in output over the course of an hour. By that point it was putting out 37 megawatts, or 1.4 per cent of nameplate capacity. At that moment, 19 of the 28 wind farms connected to the grid were producing exactly zero power to the Alberta grid, according to the Alberta Electric System Operator. They post minute-by-minute updates of the entire grid, but SaskPower does not release such data publicly, so this is the closest analog of what may be happening to the Saskatchewan grid from time to time.

Alberta’s power generation, in megawatts, at 11:06 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 18. TNG means total net to grid, while MC means maximum capacity. All are in megawatts. Alberta Electric System Operator

That said, the two most recent additions, Wheatland (120 megawatts) and Forty Mile Granlea (200 megawatts), are new to the grid and may not be fully operational. But they are listed as connected. A similar thing occurred with the Travers solar facility – it was listed for several months before showing power to the grid. At that time, the Alberta Electric System Operator told Pipeline Online that Travers was connected.

Alberta’s wind power generation, in megawatts, at 11:06 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 18. TNG means total net to grid, while MC means maximum capacity. All are in megawatts. Alberta Electric System Operator

Alberta has, by far, more energy resources than any other province in Canada. Yet three minutes later, Alberta was drawing 722 megawatts from its neighbours – 482 megawatts from British Columbia, 142 megawatts from Montana, and 98 megawatts from Saskatchewan.

This is how much power, in megawatts, Alberta was drawing from its neighbours at 11:09 a.m. on Aug. 18. Alberta Electric System Operator

 

  • 0062 TED_EPAC_Technology_30
    0062 TED_EPAC_Technology_30
  • 0061 SIMSA 2024 For Sask Buy Sask
    0061 SIMSA 2024 For Sask Buy Sask
  • 0060 Arizona Lithium Lease building
    0060 Arizona Lithium Lease building
  • 0059 Southeast College Heavy Equipment Operator
    0059 Southeast College Heavy Equipment Operator
  • 0058 Royal Helium Steveville opens anonymous rocket
    0058 Royal Helium Steveville opens anonymous rocket
  • 9002 Pipeline Online 30 sec EBEX
    9002 Pipeline Online 30 sec EBEX
  • 0055 Smart Power Be Smart with your Power office
    0055 Smart Power Be Smart with your Power office
  • 0015 Latus Viro
    0015 Latus Viro
  • 0052 Predator Inspections
    0052 Predator Inspections
  • 0051 JML Hiring Pumpjack assembly
    0051 JML Hiring Pumpjack assembly
  • 0049 Scotsburn Dental soft guitar
    0049 Scotsburn Dental soft guitar
  • 0046 City of Estevan This is Estevan
    0046 City of Estevan This is Estevan
  • 0041 DEEP Since 2018 now we are going to build
    0041 DEEP Since 2018 now we are going to build
  • 0032 IWS Summer hiring rock trailer music
  • 0022 Grimes winter hiring
  • 0021 OSY Rentals S8 Promo
  • 0018 IWS Hiring Royal Summer
  • 0013 Panther Drilling PO ad 03 top drive rigs
  • 0011
  • 0006 JK Junior
  • 9001
  • 0002

 

Alberta adds another 200 megawatt wind farm, yet still gets next to no power from its now 28 wind farms

Brian Zinchuk: On Aug. 17 Alberta’s now 28 wind farms combined were putting out less power than Boundary Dam Unit 3 with carbon capture